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Maverick Sanchez
Maverick Sanchez

Laravel: Up and Running - Learn How to Build Modern PHP Apps with this Practical Guide


Laravel: Up and Running: A Framework for Building Modern PHP Apps free download




If you are looking for a modern, powerful, and easy-to-use framework for building web applications in PHP, you should definitely check out Laravel. Laravel is one of the most popular and widely used PHP frameworks in the world, and for good reasons. In this article, we will introduce you to Laravel, show you how to get started with it, and teach you how to build a simple web application with it. We will also show you how to download Laravel: Up and Running, a comprehensive and practical guide to Laravel, for free.




Laravel: Up and Running: A Framework for Building Modern PHP Apps free download


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What is Laravel and why should you use it?




Laravel is an open-source PHP framework that follows the MVC (Model-View-Controller) architectural pattern. It was created by Taylor Otwell in 2011 and has since grown into a large and vibrant community of developers and users. Laravel aims to make web development fun, elegant, and expressive by providing a rich set of features and tools that simplify common tasks such as authentication, routing, database access, testing, caching, and more.


Some of the reasons why you should use Laravel are:


Laravel's features and benefits





  • Laravel has a beautiful and expressive syntax that makes your code more readable and maintainable.



  • Laravel has a powerful and flexible routing system that allows you to define your application's URLs in a clear and concise way.



  • Laravel has a templating engine called Blade that lets you write dynamic HTML views with embedded PHP code.



  • Laravel has an active record implementation called Eloquent that makes working with databases easy and enjoyable.



  • Laravel has a built-in authentication system that handles user registration, login, password reset, email verification, roles, permissions, and more.



  • Laravel has a dependency injection container that allows you to inject classes and services into your controllers and other classes.



  • Laravel has a testing suite that supports PHPUnit and Dusk for unit testing and browser testing.



  • Laravel has a command-line interface called Artisan that provides useful commands for generating code, running migrations, seeding databases, clearing caches, etc.



  • Laravel has a package manager called Composer that helps you manage your project's dependencies and libraries.



  • Laravel has a modular structure that allows you to organize your code into reusable components called packages.



  • Laravel has a vast ecosystem of third-party packages, tools, tutorials, books, courses, blogs, podcasts, videos, etc. that can help you learn more about Laravel and extend its functionality.



Laravel's requirements and installation




To use Laravel, you need to have the following requirements on your system:



  • PHP >= 7.3: Laravel requires PHP 7.3 or higher to run. You can check your PHP version by running php -v in your terminal.



  • Composer: Laravel uses Composer to manage its dependencies and libraries. You can install Composer from https://getcomposer.org/.



  • A web server: Laravel can run on any web server that supports PHP, such as Apache, Nginx, or IIS. You can also use the built-in PHP development server by running php artisan serve in your terminal.



  • A database: Laravel supports various databases, such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite, SQL Server, etc. You can choose the one that suits your needs and preferences.



To install Laravel, you can use one of the following methods:



  • Using Laravel Installer: Laravel provides a global installer that you can use to create new Laravel projects. To use it, you need to install it first by running composer global require laravel/installer in your terminal. Then, you can create a new Laravel project by running laravel new project-name in your terminal.



  • Using Composer create-project: You can also use Composer's create-project command to create a new Laravel project. To use it, you need to run composer create-project --prefer-dist laravel/laravel project-name in your terminal.



How to get started with Laravel




Once you have installed Laravel, you can start building your web application with it. In this section, we will show you how to create a new project with Laravel, configure your environment and database, and explore the Laravel directory structure.


Creating a new project with Laravel




To create a new project with Laravel, you can use either the Laravel Installer or the Composer create-project command, as explained in the previous section. For this example, we will use the Laravel Installer and name our project laravel-up-and-running. To do so, we need to run the following command in our terminal:


laravel new laravel-up-and-running


This will create a new directory called laravel-up-and-running in our current working directory and install all the necessary files and dependencies for our Laravel project. It will also generate a unique application key for our project and store it in the .env file.


Configuring your environment and database




Laravel uses environment variables to store various configuration settings for your application, such as your database connection details, your mail driver, your app name, etc. These variables are stored in the .env file in the root directory of your project. You can edit this file to customize your environment settings according to your needs and preferences.


For example, if you want to use MySQL as your database, you need to edit the following variables in your .env file:



DB_CONNECTION=mysql DB_HOST=127.0.0.1 DB_PORT=3306 DB_DATABASE=laravel_up_and_running DB_USERNAME=root DB_PASSWORD=


You also need to create a database called laravel_up_and_running in your MySQL server and grant access to the root user (or any other user you want to use) with the appropriate password (or no password if you leave it blank).


You can also change other variables in your .env file, such as APP_NAME, APP_URL, MAIL_DRIVER, etc. depending on your requirements and preferences.


Exploring the Laravel directory structure




Laravel follows a well-defined and organized directory structure that helps you keep your code clean and maintainable. Here is a brief overview of the main directories and files that you will find in your Laravel project:



  • app: This directory contains the core code of your application, such as your models, controllers, services, policies, etc.



  • bootstrap: This directory contains files that bootstrap your application and load its dependencies.



  • config: This directory contains configuration files for various aspects of your application, such as database, cache, mail, etc.



  • database: This directory contains files related to your database, such as migrations, seeds, factories, etc.



  • public: This directory contains the public assets of your application, such as images, stylesheets, scripts, etc. It also contains the index.php file that serves as the entry point for all requests to your application.



  • routes: This directory contains files that define the routes for your application, such as web.php, api.php, console.php, etc.



  • storage: This directory contains files that are generated by your application, such as logs, caches, sessions, etc.



  • tests: This directory contains files that are used for testing your application, such as unit tests, feature tests, etc.



  • vendor: This directory contains the Composer dependencies and libraries for your application.



  • .env: This file contains the environment variables for your application.



  • .gitignore: This file tells Git which files and directories to ignore when committing your code.



  • artisan: This file is the command-line interface for your application. You can use it to run various commands provided by Laravel and your own custom commands.



  • composer.json: This file defines the dependencies and libraries for your application. You can use it to manage your project's dependencies with Composer.



  • composer.lock: This file stores the exact versions of the dependencies and libraries that are installed for your application. You should not edit this file manually.



  • package.json: This file defines the dependencies and libraries for your front-end assets. You can use it to manage your project's dependencies with NPM or Yarn.



  • phpunit.xml: This file configures the testing suite for your application. You can use it to customize the testing options and environment variables for PHPUnit.



  • readme.md: This file provides a brief introduction and documentation for your application. You can edit this file to add more information about your project.



  • server.php: This file is used by the built-in PHP development server to serve your application. You should not edit this file unless you know what you are doing.



  • webpack.mix.js: This file configures the compilation and bundling of your front-end assets. You can use it to customize the options and plugins for Laravel Mix.



How to build a simple web application with Laravel




Now that you have a basic understanding of Laravel's structure and configuration, you are ready to build a simple web application with it. In this section, we will show you how to use Laravel's features and tools to create a simple blog application that allows users to create, read, update, and delete posts. We will also show you how to add some basic authentication and validation to our application.


Routing and controllers




The first step in building our blog application is to define the routes for our application. Routes are the URLs that map to different actions and responses in our application. For example, we can have a route that displays a list of all posts, a route that displays a single post, a route that creates a new post, etc. We can define our routes in the routes/web.php file in our project directory.


Laravel provides a fluent and expressive syntax for defining routes. We can use various methods such as get(), post(), put(), delete(), etc. to specify the HTTP verb for each route. We can also use various parameters such as name(), middleware(), prefix(), etc. to customize each route. For example, here is how we can define a route that displays a list of all posts:



Route::get('/posts', [PostController::class, 'index'])->name('posts.index');


This route tells Laravel to handle GET requests to /posts by calling the index() method of the PostController class. It also gives this route a name of posts.index, which we can use later to generate URLs or redirect to this route.


We can define other routes for our blog application in a similar way. For example, here are some more routes that we can add:



// Display a single post Route::get('/posts/post', [PostController::class, 'show'])->name('posts.show'); // Display a form to create a new post Route::get('/posts/create', [PostController::class, 'create'])->name('posts.create'); // Store a new post in the database Route::post('/posts', [PostController::class, 'store'])->name('posts.store'); // Display a form to edit an existing post Route::get('/posts/post/edit', [PostController::class, 'edit'])->name('posts.edit'); // Update an existing post in the database Route::put('/posts/post', [PostController::class, 'update'])->name('posts.update'); // Delete an existing post from the database Route::delete('/posts/post', [PostController::class, 'destroy'])->name('posts.destroy');


As you can see, we are using the post parameter to indicate that we want to pass the post's id or slug to the controller methods. Laravel will automatically inject the corresponding Post model instance into the controller methods, so we don't have to query the database ourselves.


Now that we have defined our routes, we need to create our controller class. A controller is a class that handles the logic and data for each route. We can create our controller class in the app/Http/Controllers directory in our project directory. We can also use the Artisan command make:controller to generate a controller class for us. For example, we can run the following command in our terminal to create a PostController class:



php artisan make:controller PostController


This will create a file called PostController.php in the app/Http/Controllers directory with some boilerplate code. We can edit this file to add our own code for each controller method. For example, here is how we can write the index() method that displays a list of all posts:



public function index() // Get all posts from the database $posts = Post::all(); // Return a view with the posts data return view('posts.index', ['posts' => $posts]);


This method uses the Post model to query all posts from the database and store them in a variable called $posts. Then, it returns a view called posts.index and passes the $posts variable to it. A view is a file that contains the HTML code for displaying the data in the browser. We will create our views in the next section.


We can write other controller methods in a similar way. For example, here are some more controller methods that we can add:



// Display a single post public function show(Post $post) // Return a view with the post data return view('posts.show', ['post' => $post]); // Display a form to create a new post public function create() // Return a view with an empty post instance return view('posts.create', ['post' => new Post()]); // Store a new post in the database public function store(Request $request) max:255', 'content' => 'required', ]); // Create a new post instance with the request data $post = new Post($request->all()); // Save the post to the database $post->save(); // Redirect to the post show route with a success message return redirect()->route('posts.show', $post)->with('success', 'Post created successfully.'); // Display a form to edit an existing post public function edit(Post $post) // Return a view with the post data return view('posts.edit', ['post' => $post]); // Update an existing post in the database public function update(Request $request, Post $post) // Validate the request data $request->validate([ 'title' => 'required // Delete an existing post from the database public function destroy(Post $post) // Delete the post from the database $post->delete(); // Redirect to the post index route with a success message return redirect()->route('posts.index')->with('success', 'Post deleted successfully.');


As you can see, we are using some helper methods and classes provided by Laravel, such as validate(), redirect(), route(), with(), etc. These methods and classes make our code more concise and expressive. We are also using dependency injection to inject the Request and Post instances into our controller methods. This allows us to access and manipulate the request data and the post data easily.


Views and Blade templates




for our application. Views are files that contain the HTML code for displaying the data in the browser. We can create our views in the resources/views directory in our project directory. We can also use subdirectories to organize our views into different categories. For example, we can create a subdirectory called posts to store all the views related to our blog posts. Laravel provides a templating engine called Blade that lets us write dynamic HTML views with embedded PHP code. Blade has a simple and elegant syntax that makes our views more readable and maintainable. Blade also supports various features and directives that simplify common tasks such as loops, conditionals, inheritance, components, etc. For example, here is how we can create a view called posts/index.blade.php that displays a list of all posts:


@extends('layouts.app') @section('content')


All Posts




@if(session('success'))


session('success')


@endif @auth Create Post


@endauth @if($posts->isEmpty()) No posts found.


@else




Title


Content


Actions





@foreach($posts as $post)


$post->title


Str::limit($post->content, 100)



@auth Edit



@csrf @method('DELETE') Delete



@endauth



@endforeach



@endif


@endsection


This view uses some Blade directives and features, such as: - @extends('layouts.app'): This directive tells Blade to inherit the layout from the layouts/app.blade.php file. A layout is a file that contains the common HTML code for all views, such as the header, footer, navigation, etc. We can create our own layouts or use the default one provided by Laravel. - @section('content'): This directive tells Blade to define a section called content that will be injected into the layout's @yield('content') directive. A section is a block of code that can be reused in different views or layouts. - @if, @else, @endif: These directives allow us to write conditional statements in Blade. We can use any PHP expression inside these directives. - @auth, @endauth: These directives allow us to check if the user is authenticated or not. We can use these directives to show or hide certain parts of our views based on the user's authentication status. - : These symbols allow us to echo PHP variables or expressions in Blade. Blade will automatically escape any HTML characters in these symbols to prevent XSS attacks. - !! !!: These symbols allow us to echo raw HTML code in Blade. Blade will not escape any HTML characters in these symbols, so we should use them with caution and only with trusted sources. - route('posts.show', $post) : This expression allows us to generate a URL for a named route in Blade. We can pass any parameters that the route requires as the second argument. -


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